About Kalajoki

Kalajoki lies in the Western coast on the shore of the Bothnian Bay and about in the half way of Finland between the South and North. The Bothnian Bay is the most northern part of the Baltic Sea.

The nearest airports are Kokkola and Oulu and the nearest railway station is Kokkola. It is easy to come to Kalajoki by car; the road #8 goes through it.


History

For 10 000 year ago the Kalajoki area was covered by ice thickness of two kilometres. The weight of the ice pressed the surface of the earth down and the water filled the hole. The land began to rise from the water (sea), yearly speed was several centimetres, and nowadays it is about 8 millimetres per year.
The landscape is very flat, because of the land rising. There is a lot of wood, mainly pine wood. The name of the city comes from the stream “Kalajoki”, which means “Fish River”. Actually there are many rivers running to the Bothnian Bay from the inner land. That’s why the water in the sea is so called broke water, the saltiness is only 0,35%.

                                      
Nature

The land rising has given the landscape and nature many unique and special features. One of them is sand dunes in the beach. You can find 6 kilometres long sandy beaches in Kalajoki, the most northern in Europe. They are called Hiekkasärkät (Sand dunes) and have allured domestic people already 100 years time with “the sea, sun and sand”.
Other is small stream Siiponjoki, witch meanders deep in the sandy soil like a snake. The Rahja Archipelago forming from about 100 different size of islands is risen from the sea. And so have the two very special islands Maakalla and Ulkokalla, which lie in the middle of the sea. They have a history as communities of the seal hunters and fishermen, the tiny Ulkokalla also base of the lighthouse and its lighthouse men with their families.


Inhabitants

The first inhabitants were Sami, the ancestors of the people who now live in Lapland. Then people from Southern and Eastern Finland and began to come here to hunt. Since the 13th century the population has been permanent. Fishing was very important in those days and one can say that people in area have always lived from the sea. Except fishing they have built ships, sailed with them all-around the seas in the world. Later also agriculture was developed and has been important livelihood. Now we are about 12 000 inhabitants living in a area of 2400 km2.
Now we live from metal and woodwork industry, services (incl. tourism and harbour), fur animal farming and agriculture.


Tourism

Now the the Hiekkasärkät has became a holiday village with several hotels, camping areas, many holiday houses and cottages, different kind of restaurants and a Sea Life Centre. There are also many kind of activities; golf, spa, water park, carting, all terrain vehicles, Nordic walking, hiking on the beach or in the wood, canoeing, boat trips; in winter skiing, snow mobiles, snow shoe walking etc.
Outside but close to the holiday village is farm holidays, the archipelago and islands Maakalla and Ulkokalla, where you can also accommodate in the former residence of the lighthouse men.Kalajoki lies in the Western coast on the shore of the Bothnian Bay and about in the half way of Finland between the South and North. The Bothnian Bay is the most northern part of the Baltic Sea.

The nearest airports are Kokkola and Oulu and the nearest railway station is Kokkola. It is easy to come to Kalajoki by car; the road #8 goes through it.

See some images: